Category Archives: Books

New Occupational Records now on TheGenealogist

New Occupational Records now on TheGenealogist

religious-occupational-records-on-thegenealogist

If your ancestor held a prominent position in a religious organisation then you may find them in amongst a number of recent releases at TheGenealogist.co.uk. The new records include:

 

  • The Year Book of The Church of England in the Dominion of Canada 1926 & 1935 These year books contain the details of the members of clergy in Canada.
  • New Zealand Methodist Union Index 1913Listing details of Methodist Ministers and their placements in New Zealand up to 1912.
  • Catholic Directory 1867 & 1877 –  Directories of Catholic Clergy with addresses for England, Scotland and Wales.
  • Biographical Dictionary of English Catholics 1534 to 1885This work by Joseph Gillow gives biographies of prominent Catholics which often include details of their family, education and achievements.
  • Shropshire Roman Catholic Registers 1763-1837
  • The Roman Catholics in the County of York 1604
  • Various Catholic Record Society volumesThese include a variety of interesting records including various Catholic Church registers, memoirs and letters of prominent Catholics and Recusant Rolls.
  • Jewish Year Books 1896-99, 1901-8, 1910-11, 1918-21, 1925, and 1928-39These year books list the details of prominent people within each synagogue, obituaries, Jewish officers in the Army, Navy and Auxiliary Forces, Ministers, MPs, Peers, and even Jewish ‘Celebrities’ of the time.
  • Jewish Synagogue Seatholders in London for 1920, 1922, 1925, 1927, 1929, 1931, 1933, 1937
  • The Clergyman’s Almanack 1821 & 1822These Almanacks list archbishops, bishops, dignitaries, MPs and Peers.
  • Register of Missionaries 1796-1923A register of the missionaries and deputations of the London Society of Missionaries. This book includes many details about each missionary, as well as listing their wives (including their maiden name).
  • Durham Diocesan Calendar 1931

 

These records compliment an already wide range of religious occupational records such as Cox’s Clergy Lists and Crockford’s Clerical Directories, Jewish Seatholders, Catholic Registers, and Directories already on TheGenealogist.

 

Diamond subscribers can access these records by going to the Search tab on the home page – scrolling down to Occupational Records and then selecting the type of records that they are interested in.

Go to: TheGenealogist.co.uk.

Save £14.95 when you buy RootsMagic UK Version 7 Platinum Edition & Getting the Most out of RootsMagic 7 Book

Here is a timely Special Offer!

Take a look here before it is too late! http://genealogysupplies.com/offer-of-the-week/

Save £14.95 when you buy RootsMagic UK Version 7 Platinum Edition & Getting the Most out of RootsMagic 7 Book – only £49.95!

RootsMagic has become one of the UK’s most favoured genealogy packages. This software is comprehensive yet easy to use, and creates superb wallcharts and integrates with research sites. It is the top rated program in numerous reviews and articles which emphasise RootsMagic’s ease of use and powerful features.

Version 7 is the latest edition of this award-winning full-featured genealogy program published by S&N. This great package is authored by Bruce Buzbee, the author of Family Origins.

UK Platinum Edition – with over £105 worth of online data and CDs

S&N’s most popular package, the UK Platinum Edition includes:

  • RootsMagic 7 UK Edition software
  • 3 Month Online subscription to the award winning website www.TheGenealogist.co.uk, providing access to BMDs, Census 1841 – 1901, Military Rolls of Honour, Directories, Parish Records, Wills, Land Owner Records, and more.
  • Bartholomew’s 1898 Atlas of England and Wales, a complete series of topographical maps, statistical charts, town plans, and index of 35,000 place names. This atlas also contains street maps showing places no longer in existence through development or bombing in WWII.
  • Printed Quick Start manual
  • UK spellcheck dictionary
  • Movie Tour of RootsMagic
  • Index to Change of Names 1760 – 1901 UK and Ireland
  • General Armory of England, Scotland and Ireland 1894 (Encyclopedia of Heraldry)
  • English and Welsh Landowners 1873
  • Scottish Landowners 1872–1873
  • Irish Landowners

Getting the Most out of RootsMagic Book

RootsMagic is the easiest genealogy software available, yet many people will barely touch the tip of the iceberg of RootsMagic’s features. If you are one of these people, then this book is for you. You start with basic data entry and continue by learning advanced techniques such as custom reports, citing sources, GEDCOM, creating user-defined facts, scanning images, and merging. Mix that with time-saving shortcuts, and you soon will have a complete understanding of RootsMagic and its hidden powers.

Written by the author of RootsMagic, Getting the Most Out of RootsMagic will teach you how to:

  • Create a detailed family history
  • Explore the advanced concepts and techniques
  • Properly document your entire family history for future generations
  • Publish your family history
  • Add photos to bring your family history to life
  • Use shortcuts to speed-up data entry
  • Create customised wall charts
  • Organise your unfinished research using RootsMagic
  • Share your family history on the World Wide Web

Save 40% on the Phillimore Atlas and Index of Parish Registers

You may need to be quick, but here is a great special offer we spotted this week. Makes a great gift for family historians!

Save 40% on the Phillimore Atlas and Index of Parish Registers

This guide to parish registers, now in its third edition, and covering England, Scotland and Wales, is a vital, time-saving tool that has become universally known as ‘the genealogist’s bible’.

The Atlas includes the famous county ‘parish’ maps, which show pre-1832 parochial boundaries, colour-coded probate jurisdictions, starting dates of surviving registers, and churches and chapels, where relevant.

Topographical maps face each ‘parish’ map, and show the contemporary road system and other local features, to help deduce the likely movement of people beyond the searcher’s starting point.

The Index lists the parishes, with grid references to the county maps. It indicates the present whereabouts of original registers and copies, and whether a parish is included in other indexes. It also gives registration districts and census information.

Thus, in this invaluable guide, the user may quickly find answers to such questions as: Have the registers been deposited? Where may they be found? What outside dates do they cover? Have they been copied or indexed and by whom?

Get your copy for £29.95

http://genealogysupplies.com/offer-of-the-week/

The Phillimore Atlas and Index of Parish Registers

The History & Heritage Handbook 2015/16 a great reference book for all.

The new History & Heritage Handbook 2015/16 edited by Andrew Chapman  and published by Heritage Hunter came out recently.

Flicking through a copy we were very impressed by just how comprehensive  a guide it was to almost 3500 places and organisations in the UK , the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man all listed across more than 500 pages.

Each of the entries provides the contact details and a brief description, many of which give specific information about specialist collections.

Use it to

  • research your family history: includes details of county record offices and family history societies
  • find thousands of heritage sites to visit on holiday or for day trips
  • learn about special archives in museums and libraries across the UK, ideal for researching local, social or military history

or it can also be found at various other suppliers such as: S&N Genealogy Supplies

History and Heritage Handbook

Hardback £24.99     ISBN 9781905315598

Getting the Most out of RootsMagic – Seventh Edition – by Bruce Buzbee

Just found this New book to help you get the most out of RootsMagic at online genealogy shop: S&N Genealogy Supplies.

RootsMagic is the easiest genealogy software available, yet many people will barely touch the tip of the iceberg of RootsMagic’s features. If you are one of these people, then this book is for you.

You start with basic data entry and continue by learning advanced techniques such as custom reports, citing sources, GEDCOM, creating user-defined facts, scanning images, and merging.

Mix that with time-saving short-cuts, and you soon will have a complete understanding of RootsMagic and its hidden powers.

Written by the author of RootsMagic, Getting the Most Out of RootsMagic will teach you how to:

 

  • Create a detailed family history
  • Explore the advanced concepts and techniques
  • Properly document your entire family history for future generations
  • Publish your family history
  • Add photos to bring your family history to life
  • Use short-cuts to speed-up data entry
  • Create customised wall charts
  • Organise your unfinished research using RootsMagic
  • Share your family history on the World Wide Web 

    No. of Pages: 383

Getting-the-Most-out-of-RootsMagic-Seventh-Edition

 

Available from S&N Genealogy Supplies.

 

 

It’s not what you know, its who your ancestors were!

If your surname reveals that your family came over from Normandy, the last time that England was conquered, then even today you are more likely to be upper class than the average member of the population in Britain. Quite astonishingly, the social status of your ancestors has more influence on your life chances than on your height. Normans recorded as property owners in the Domesday book of 1086 are 16 times more likely to be at Oxford or Cambridge in 1170 and still 25% more likely that their ancestors are there today.

Gregory Clark of the University of California, Davis and Neil Cummins from the London School of Economics have published an article in the Journal of Human Nature that shows that social mobility from 1170 to 2012 has always been slow and even now is not much greater than in the pre-industrial period.

An example being the Bunduck family whose name regularly appeared in the registers of the Oxbridge universities consistently from the 12th century until the modern day. The Bunducks were also found on the rich property owners’ database, which is another suggestion that they were of a higher class as is their appearance on the 19th century probate registry.

‘Strong forces of familial culture, social connections, and genetics must connect the generations,’ said Mr Clark.

‘Even more remarkable is the lack of a sign of any decline in status persistence across major institutional changes, such as the Industrial Revolution of the eighteenth century, the spread of universal schooling in the late nineteenth century, or the rise of the social democratic state in the twentieth century,’ added Mr Cummins.

Source: The Son Also Rises: Surnames and the History of Social Mobility. Gregory Clark (with Neil Cummins, Yu Hao, and Daniel Diaz Vidal and others), 2014. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.

The Son Also Rises

Family history shop added to online site.

If you read my last post, then you will know that with a month to go I was writing my list for Santa (or at least as a massive hint for loved ones to buy me something useful this year!). So it is very timely that this news has come in from the team at TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist Family History Shop is now open!

Christmas is coming; it’s that time for giving and receiving again.

Are you looking for some great gifts to make a family historian happy this festive period? Simply head over to the fantastic new shop pages recently added to TheGenealogist for a great selection of scanners, software, archival storage, spring binders and charts. Made available in association with S&N Genealogy Supplies, the UK’s largest genealogy publisher and retailer, your present selection is covered this Yuletide.

While you are there, why not browse for something for yourself? To make sure that you get what you want in your stocking this year, just drop your loved ones the hint by giving them TheGenealogist shop’s page link.

TheGenealogist shop
TheGenealogist shop 

http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/shop/

Christmas presents for the genealogist

Christmas is coming; it’s that time for giving and receiving again. So its probably a good idea to start thinking about what a family historian might want to put on this year’s letter to Santa. So here is mine to get people started!

That  shoe box of photos, certificates and A4 family-pedigrees could really do with being more organised. I would really love it if, this Christmas, under my tree I’d find some hard backed binders, to protect all that valuable research I’ve done and preserve it in a more presentable way for future generations of the family to read.

Gift vouchers to allow me to buy exactly what I want are always well received, especially if they are family history related!

I would also be so grateful if that kind person, who regularly gives me the box of shortbread’s that does nothing for my waist line after all the other food on offer at this time of year, would substitute the biscuits with a non edible present instead. Perhaps a useful set of charts to present my family tree in a more attractive way than the print out from my computer, or the scribbled hand drawn tree on that sheet of paper that I have at the moment?

At the top of my list (hint ,hint!) would be a portable scanner, to capture images of the certificates and photographs that I see on visits to my relatives or at the archives.

Flip Pal

Latest reading – Ancestors in the Attic

An interesting book we’ve recently read which is a good practical read and full of interesting historical points,  is the Karen Foy book – ‘Ancestors in the Attic- Making family memorabilia into history’.

With the main emphasis these days on the convenience of finding family history records quickly online, Karen looks instead at the valuable treasures we can find in lofts and cupboards or heirlooms left by our ancestors which can throw significant light on how they lived and what life was like. Karen carefully examines many aspects from journals kept, old tickets, the newspapers they read, mementoes kept, military medals , ration books and fashions that were popular at that time. The book advises what to look for and the clues we can find from many different types of memorabilia and the history behind many of the artifacts we come across.

It’s well worth a read, currently available at the sale price of £11.95 from the S&N Genealogy Supplies website.

Ancestors in the Attic
Ancestors in the Attic- new book available from Karen Foy

New Irish books well worth a read…

For those family historians with Irish ancestry, there’s a couple of new books now available from Flyleaf Press which may be of interest. They form part of the ‘Tracing your…’ series looking at specific counties in Ireland and offer excellent guidance on how best to go about finding records and generally how to discover more about your Irish ancestors.

The 2 latest books I have discovered are ‘Tracing Your Cork Ancestors’ by Tony McCarthy and Tim Cadogan and ‘Tracing Your Roscommon Ancestors’ by John Hamrock. Cork is the largest Irish county with a diverse social history and equally diverse sets of records available. Roscommon is one of the smallest Irish counties with a history based primarily around agriculture that suffered greatly in the famine.

If you need some advice and guidance on researching your Irish history for either of these counties or the other Irish counties for that matter, this series of books will definitely be of interest. They can be ordered at S&N Genealogy Supplies at http://www.genealogysupplies.com/product_search.php?search=Irish&titlebar=true

Have you read any of the series? Let us know!

Tracing Your Cork Ancestors
New Irish county books available at S&N Genealogy