Category Archives: Census

TheGenealogist reveals its plans for 2017 record releases

 

Press Release from TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist logo

What TheGenealogist has in store for 2017

2017 is going to see millions of new records added to TheGenealogist across a wide variety of collections.

New Data Sets

We are adding millions of new and unique Parish Records and Bishops’ Transcripts are being added for many more counties.

A new and unique record set covering detailed records of our ancestors houses, which will be searchable by name, address and area, with high resolution maps showing the property.

Our ongoing project with The National Archives is set to release yet more detailed Colour County and Tithe Maps with tags to show where your ancestors lived.

We are releasing a 1921 census substitute, using a wide variety of records including Trade and Residential Directories of the time.

New decades of BT27 Passenger Lists and Emigration Records will become available.

Our International Headstone Project will be expanded with more Commonwealth Cemeteries added.

More worldwide War Memorials added to our comprehensive database.

Following on from our release of over 230 million U.S. records in 2016, we will be launching more U.S. records in 2017.

 

New & Improved Census Images

Thanks to new technology and new Silver Halide Film provided by The National Archives, we have now been able to re-scan the 1891 census with improved resolution and quality. This combination of improved readability and new transcripts will help locate your ancestors and view the relevant images with a superior grayscale format. Our “Deep Zoom” images have over 5 times the resolution of previous images. They will be lightening fast to view thanks to the  technology used in our new image interface. We will launch these new images in early 2017.

 

Look out for these exciting new developments and more in 2017 at TheGenealogist.co.uk

 

TheGenealogist are launching over 220 million US records

This press announcement is from TheGenealogist:

We are expanding our international records with the release of:

  • 90 million Social Security Death records 1935-2014
  • 1940 Census Images containing 132 million records with searchable transcripts linked to the Enumeration Maps
  • Irish immigration records for 604,596 persons arriving in New York 1846-1851

Many people hit a brick wall where an ancestor seems to disappear from all the records in the U.K. It could be that they have gone abroad for a period or emigrated for good. If your elusive ancestor went to the United States of America, TheGenealogist’s expanded international records can help.

 

Social Security Death Records

The U.S. Social Security Death Index is a database of over 90 million death records. These give information of those who died from 1936 whose death has been reported to the Social Security Administration.

The data includes: Given name and surname; Date of birth; Month and year of death (or full date of death for accounts active in 2000 or later); Social Security number; State or territory where the Social Security number was issued; Last place of residence while the person was alive (ZIP code).

 

1940 Census

The American census is searchable by first name, surname, age, state, county, street address and place of birth (allowing us to find Brits enumerated in the American census). The records give details of over 132 million individuals with a transcription along with the actual image of the schedule. Where available, the record is also linked to the Enumeration Index Map for the area so that you can see exactly which street your ancestor lived on. Our transcripts also have the added benefit of street addresses included, allowing you to search for a street rather than an individual.

The 1940 Census transcripts on TheGenealogist are not the same as those found elsewhere online; apart from the linked maps and street addresses, we have also audited the images discovering many that haven’t been transcribed previously elsewhere. These are also being added to our records.

US 1940 census with maps

 

We believe that experienced researchers will welcome this release, knowing that having alternative transcripts to those already available gives the family historian a better chance of finding people whose names have been difficult to read or have contained errors in the other databases.

 

New York Immigration Records

The New York Port Arrival 1846-1851 series gives the family historian access to useful information about immigrants from Ireland to the United States during the era of the Irish Potato Famine, identifying 604,596 persons who arrived in the Port of New York and giving the name of the ships on which they arrived. Approximately 70 percent of the passengers listed were natives of Ireland, with the rest being nationals of 32 countries that included Canada, Brazil, Saint Croix, Russia, Morocco, the United States and various European countries. Information contained in these records include name, age, town of last residence, destination, passenger arrival date, and codes for the passenger’s gender, occupation, literacy, native country, transit status, travel compartment, passenger port of embarkation, and the identification number for the ship manifest.

 

These new records join TheGenealogist’s growing collection of other U.S.A. data sets such as the WWII PoW records, Early Settlers and Emigrants to America, Passenger Lists, American Wills, Almanacs and Directories.

New video available from TheGenealogist

Continuing the series of help and instructional videos, Mark Bayley from TheGenealogist has released a short video looking at how to search by address or street on the Census records using the excellent Master Search tools on TheGenealogist.co.uk

Also the £50 cashback offer is still available, visit TheGenealogist to take advantage of the limited time offer of a reduced price subscription.

 

Proposals to change the next UK Census

A formal proposal to change the traditional paper census form to an online version only has been put to Francis Maude, the Cabinet Office Minister,  by the Office of National Statistics with a view to saving the government a large amount of money.

After almost 200 hundred years of using a paper format census, the new proposals are controversial but the argument is with the advances of new technology, there is a chance to save hundreds of millions of pounds by going down the online route.

Elderly people or those unable to use get access to the internet will be given special assistance but officials hope the plans will slash the potential cost of the next census in 2021.

What do you think, should the paper version be kept or is it best to move to an online only format?

“Beyond 2011” Census consultation

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is consulting on the census and the future provision of population statistics in England and Wales.

It is considering options for how and when information is gathered on the population in future, which may possibly involve an end to the Census, which has been around since 1801, such an important document for family historians in their research.

The consultation is open for just a few more days, until 13 December 2013. Individuals and organisations are encouraged to take part. The Federation of Family History Societies (FFHS) has got involved and submitted its comments in the online questionnaire. The comments they make and the links to the Consultation Paper and Survey Form can all be found on the Federation website. The direct link to the Office of National Statistics consultation page can be found here.

 

 

 

 

Duplication of records on a census?

A handy tip for all those new to family history research is always be alert to the fact an ancestor could appear on a census listing more than once. If your ancestor moved around a bit, or lived an unconventional lifestyle there is always the chance they may have ended up listed in the census more than once.

A case in point is that of daring early aviator and showman, Samuel Franklin Cody. American born but living and working in Britain around the turn of the 20th Century. Before becoming employed by The British Army, he worked with his family on a wild west show and regularly toured around Britain and Europe. Samuel Cody then became interested in aviation and subsequently became one of the leading pioneers of British aviation.

Samuel Cody
Samuel Franklin Cody, leading aviator and showman

However, around 1901, the Cody family, with their show and their lifestyle, inevitably meant moving about quite a bit which may explain his two entries in the 1901 census. Both entries are from the Cheshire census and it looks like the Cody family may have had two temporary places of accommodation as they took their show around the North West of England. Both Samuel (senior) and his son Samuel Frank Leslie Cody appear listed on the 1901 census records in the screenshot below from TheGenealogist.

Samuel Cody 1901 census

Samuel Cody 1901 census entries on TheGenealogist

 This famous example shows what can occur so always look out for those duplicate records!

Celebrating International Women’s Day- looking back at the ‘no vote, no census’ campaign

Today, Friday 8th March, marks International Women’s Day around the world. There are various initiatives running throughout the UK with events such as ‘Empowering Women through Science and Technology, Celebrating Achievement’ and a ‘Name Your Heroine Competition’ occurring today.

A number of the genealogy websites have delved into their records to unearth heroines of the past who have furthered the cause of women’s rights. From Emmeline Pankhurst to her daughter Sylvia, from Millicent Fawcett to Mabel Capper to Emily Davison who was tragically killed by King George V’s horse in the Epsom Derby, there are numerous records around the turn of the 20th century of our ancestors campaigning and pushing for women’s rights.

The ‘No Vote, no census’ campaign was quite vociferous around the time of the 1911 census. As we can see from the examples below, those pushing for women’s rights used the first opportunity people had to fill in their own census forms to make their point and further the cause. The 1911 census forms were deliberately spoiled to heighten awareness, some 102 years later these forms of protest have given us a unique snapshot into the struggles of the time and how hard these women campaigned. Worth celebrating on International Women’s Day!

1911 Census record for Isabella Leo
1911 Census record for Isabella Leo

Jessie Smith result

 

Jessie Smith transcript