Monthly Archives: July 2015

The BBC announce the schedule for Who Do You Think You Are? 12th series

The BBC has now announced the order in which the Who do You Think You Are? episodes will be broadcast for the 12th U.K. series.

This popular genealogy TV programme kicks off with Great British Bake Off judge Paul Hollywood on 13th August, on BBC One. The series will be aired every Thursday evening at 9pm, with a one week break in between Mark Gatiss and Frances de la Tour’s episodes on 15th October.

Although the schedule may still be subject to change, Frances de la Tour’s story will close the series on 22nd of October.

 

 

Paul_Hollywood
Paul_Hollywood

TheGenealogist releases London Jewish Synagogue Seatholders records online

Jewish Synagogue Seatholder records go online.

TheGenealogist has announced that it has released online 99,500 records of London synagogue seat-holders spanning the years from 1920 to 1939.

  • Covering the records from 18 Synagogues around London with many connected guilds, societies and charities etc.

  • Additional information found in these records include names of gentlemen eligible for office, life member of the council, women who are seatholders in their own right and seatholders who are not eligible to vote.

  • Fully searchable by name, keyword, synagogue and address, the Jewish Synagogue Seatholders has been extracted from various years of: “Seatholders for Synagogues in London”

Those with Jewish ancestors from London will welcome this fascinating new release from TheGenealogist. Revealing details of positions held by forebears, researchers will be able to track ancestors who became wardens, council members, or served on committees of their synagogue, as well as seatholders in synagogues from around the capital city. These fully indexed records allow family historians to search by name, keyword, synagogue and address and with one click see an image taken from the pages of Seatholders for Synagogues in London.

The records include some synagogues that are no longer in existence; for example the Great Synagogue that once stood at Duke’s Place and which was destroyed in the Blitz.

Nigel Bayley, MD of TheGenealogist said: “These records will allow you to search for Jewish relatives amongst the London synagogue seatholders, it is now easier than ever to discover any official positions that your Jewish ancestor held.”

TheGenealogist  provided the following  example:

Lionel Nathan de Rothschild, OBE (25 January 1882 – 28 January 1942) can be found in these records. De Rothschild was an English banker and a Conservative politician who was well known as the creator of Exbury Gardens near the New Forest in Hampshire. He was the eldest of the three sons of Leopold de Rothschild (1845–1917) and Marie née Perugia (1862–1937) and a part of the illustrious Rothschild banking family of England.

On 25 January 1910 he was elected to the House of Commons for the constituency of Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire – his grandfather and namesake had been the first practising Jew to be able to take up his seat in Parliament.

Exbury House

Exbury House from wikipedia

His father, Leopold, died in early 1917 and Lionel and brother Anthony became the managing partners of N M Rothschild & Sons bank. However, Lionel de Rothschild had developed an interest in horticulture at a very young age and is said to have planted his first garden at the age of five. In 1919, he purchased the Mitford estate at Exbury in Hampshire where he devoted a great deal of time and money to transform it into one of the finest gardens in all of England with more than one million plants building Exbury House around an existing structure in a neo-Georgian style. Although he continued to work at the family bank, he is quoted as describing himself as “a banker by hobby — a gardener by profession”. Lionel Nathan de Rothschild died in London, aged sixty, in 1942 and was buried in the Willesden Jewish Cemetery.

Logging into TheGenealogist and selecting Jewish Synagogue Seatholders from the dropdown menu, we enter Lionel as a forename and De Rothschild as the surname. We can filter the results by date. This returns us several positions that De Rothschild held in three different synagogues in London, including the Warden of the Great Synagogue that once stood in Duke’s Place, north of Aldgate, until it was destroyed in the London Blitz. We can also see that he was the President of the United Synagogue in North Finchley. Selecting that record allows us to view the actual image of the page from the Seatholders for Synagogues in London 1920.

Lionel de R President United Synagogue - transcript

Lionel de Rothschild President United Synagogue

To find your London Jewish ancestors in these records go now to TheGenealogist website.

How to start your family tree video

If you want to know how to start your family tree then here is a really useful video in which FeeBee shows you how to get started building your tree and also shares a great way to keep organised at the same time.

Hope you enjoy it!

Links used in this episode:
http://TreeView.co.uk
http://TheGenealogist.co.uk/Roots1

 

   “Hi I’m FeeBee in in this video up explaining how to get started in the fascinating world a family history the first step is to write down everything you already know about  yourself and your immediate family when where were you born? Who were your parents?
   Include dates and places of birth where known, next about you extended family, who were your grandparents and where did they live? Again, if you have dates of birth this will help you later on. Once you have the basic information ask any living relatives what they know or remember. You may find some research has already been done on a tree or they may be a collection of memorabilia documents or photographs that someone is willing to share with you the next step is to put this information into a tree builder.
   I use TreeView because I can access it anywhere has lots of charting options and
best of all it’s free.
   Let’s begin entering the information to TreeView. Start with yourself and then add your parents. Continue up the tree this way until you have entered all the information you have gathered. You can then look what you’ve entered so far and see which individuals have information missing such as names, dates the birth marriage and death places, events have taken place and so on. To fill in this missing information you should start looking at birth marriage and death and census records.
   There are lots of web sites that can help you with your research.
I use TheGenealogist they have a free trial available at TheGenealogist.co.uk/Roots1
   First try searching the census they should give you ages which you can use to find
approximate dates of birth. Using this information you can then search on the birth certificate index and so your research begins. Although it can be exciting to uncover many different branches of the tree bear in mind it is often easier to concentrate your search one direct line at a time.
  To recap, firstly gather what information you can buy talking to your living relatives
and start to input this information into to a tree builder as this will help keep you organized.
   Look into birth marriage and death and census records as the next step in adding information to what you already have.
   Thanks for watching this episode of RootsForum
   I hope you enjoyed this video. If you like this video and would like to see more go to YouTube.com/RootsForum  and hit subscribe if you have any questions ideas for the videos

The History & Heritage Handbook 2015/16 a great reference book for all.

The new History & Heritage Handbook 2015/16 edited by Andrew Chapman  and published by Heritage Hunter came out recently.

Flicking through a copy we were very impressed by just how comprehensive  a guide it was to almost 3500 places and organisations in the UK , the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man all listed across more than 500 pages.

Each of the entries provides the contact details and a brief description, many of which give specific information about specialist collections.

Use it to

  • research your family history: includes details of county record offices and family history societies
  • find thousands of heritage sites to visit on holiday or for day trips
  • learn about special archives in museums and libraries across the UK, ideal for researching local, social or military history

or it can also be found at various other suppliers such as: S&N Genealogy Supplies

History and Heritage Handbook

Hardback £24.99     ISBN 9781905315598

Discover Your Ancestors Online Periodical for July Out Now!

 

The July issue of Discover Your Ancestors Periodical is now available online!

This month you can read an article by Laura Berry that reveals how to research the history of homes in England and Wales, Chris Paton looks at Scottish kirk records and Sharon Brookshaw explores how our ancestors entertained themselves as children, plus so much more.

Discover Your Ancestors Online Periodical is a high quality monthly digital periodical delivered to your own personalised online account every month. It is a beautifully designed 20 page online periodical and is packed full of stories, case studies, social history articles and research advice.

You can buy your copy here today:  http://www.discoveryourancestors.co.uk/current-issue/

Discover Your Ancestors Periodical