Monthly Archives: March 2016

Anita Rani: Celebrity at the Who Do You Think You Are? Live Show 2016

 

Who Do You Think You Are? Live will run at the NEC from 7 to 9 April. Anita Rani is due to appear on Saturday April 9 at 10.15 to 11:00 and 12.15 to 13:00. To book tickets go to here.

The 38 year-old Countryfile presenter, who is of Punjabi descent but raised in Bradford, was reduced to tears on the WDYTYA? TV programme earlier this year when she heard about the horrific circumstances in which her maternal grandfather, Sant Singh lost his first wife and children during the Partition of India.

Who Do You Think You Are? Photographer: Stephen Perry
Who Do You Think You Are? Photographer: Stephen Perry

Who Do You Think You Are? Live is packed with exhibitors that can help you trace your  own ancestors whether you are a beginner or a seasoned family historian. There will be a number of useful talks being held in a number of places inside the National Exhibition Centre hall including Breaking Down Brick Walls in your family history research by Mark Bayley of TheGenelogist, seen here at a previous year’s show.

Talks at Who Do You Think You Are?
Mark Bayley of TheGenealogist delivers one of his popular talks

The Society of Genealogists will also be running an extensive programme of talks by leading genealogists over the course of the three day show and they promise that there will be a choice of many different talks to attend covering a vast array of subjects from: Different Research Techniques, How to Record your Findings and Using Parish Registers to My Ancestor was an “Alien,” The Luck of the Irish and My Ancestor’s made Hats.

Will you be going?

 

Discover Your Ancestors March edition is now out!

Discover Your Ancestors Online Periodical has published their March 2016 edition.

The Discover Your Ancestors Periodical is a high quality monthly digital magazine that is delivered to the subscriber’s own personalised online account every month. The 30+ page online magazine is packed full of stories, case studies, social history articles and research advice and is  great for anyone starting out in family history research, or even for those with more experience but who have reached brick walls in their family history.

Discover Your Ancestors March 2016
Discover Your Ancestors March 2016

This months articles include:

Heavy work: Sue Wilkes digs into the lives and work of Britain’s lead miners
Criminally insane or cold-blooded murderer?: Nick Thorne researches a 19th century cause célèbre using TheGenealogist’s record collections
The privilege of the feu…: Chris Paton explores the ownership records for Scottish land and property
The ancestral laptop: Ruth A Symes explores the history of family writing desks, and what family historians can learn from them
History in the details: Jayne Shrimpton on trousers
Meaning business: Jill Morris investigates the history of limited companies
Regular features: This month’s region: Cheshire / News / Events / Books  / Classifieds

Read Discover Your Ancestors Today: http://www.discoveryourancestors.co.uk/current-issue/

Find World War II Prisoners Of War online

Leading British Genealogy Website, TheGenealogist, has added over 150,000 World War II Prisoner of War records to its already significant military records collection. These new records detail Officers and other ranks from the British Army, Royal Navy, RAF and those members of the British Empire land forces that were held as Prisoners of War in Germany and German Occupied territories.

This release will allow researchers to discover servicemen held by the Germans between 1939-1945 and includes many of the brave escapees whose stories of breaking out and dashing to freedom have captured the imagination for decades.

These records allow us to:

  • Research POWs who served in Armies and other land forces of Britain and the Empire 1939-45 along with the Naval and Air Forces of Great Britain and the Empire 1939-1945

  • Find names and details of men who were captured and incarcerated in German POW camps in Europe

  • Check the details such as names, service numbers, and regiments of ancestors that were German POWs

  • Search for daring escapees from within the camp lists

  • Research where your military ancestors were held, revealing their camp number and location

  • Discover the ranks, POW numbers, Service numbers and Regiments of those held

Covering the Nazi German camps in Europe, these lists are taken from official alphabetical nominal registers and reveal names and other particulars of:

  • 94,608 British POWs in Germany, including Officers and other ranks

  • 39,805 POWs from Empire Land Forces

  • 19,250 Naval & Air Force POWs from Britain & its Empire

Joining an already comprehensive range of military records on TheGenealogist that span from 1661 to the 1940s, these lists are a useful addition for researchers. TheGenealogist’s military collections already include Army, Navy and Air Force Lists, Dambuster records, First World War POWs, plus many other records.

Examining some of the names of WWII Prisoners of War released online at TheGenealogist.co.uk allows us to uncover the brave and determined Allied servicemen who made escape attempts from the Nazi German PoW Camps. One brave serviceman, although hampered by being a double amputee from an air accident from before the war, still did his duty to try and escape.

The famous WW2 Air Ace with no legs – Douglas Bader

Douglas_Bader_headshot
Douglas Bader by Devon S A (Mr), Royal Air Force official photographer [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

From the RAF Officers listed in the recently released Second World War Prisoner of War lists on TheGenealogist, we can find Acting Wing Commander Douglas Bader, whose story was immortalized in the book and film Reach for the Sky.

On 9th August 1941, Bader, a formidable air ace, was flying a Spitfire on patrol over France when he was forced to bail out over German-occupied territory. He had jettisoned the spitfire’s cockpit canopy, released his harness pin, and the air rushing past the open cockpit started to suck him out. Unfortunately, for Bader, his prosthetic leg was trapped in the plane and he was part way out of the cockpit but still attached to his aircraft. Bader and his aircraft fell for some time before he released his parachute, at which point the leg’s retaining strap snapped under the strain and so he managed to get free of the plane. Captured, the Germans treated him with respect and even gave the British free passage to drop off a replacement leg for Bader over a German occupied French airfield.

POW WW2 on TheGenealogist

Bader didn’t appreciate being a prisoner of war and made a number of escape attempts. Because he was considered likely to break out again by his captors, he was eventually sent to the infamous Colditz Castle – as we can see from the record on TheGenealogist, it shows he was incarcerated in Camp No: O4C which relates to Oflag 4C Saalhaus Colditz. It was here that Douglas Bader remained for the rest of the war until April 1945 when the camp was eventually liberated by the United States Army.

His name can be seen on the Battle of Britain War Memorial on the Victoria Embankment. A record, plus an image of this memorial, can be found on TheGenealogist amongst other military records that also include mentions of Douglas Bader in the various Air Lists.

The addition of the World War II Prisoner of War records to TheGenealogist gives family historians a fascinating insight into this period of recent history and allows them to add more depth to their research.

War Memorial Records on TheGenealogist
War Memorial Records on TheGenealogist