Monthly Archives: April 2016

Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2016 show reports

 

Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2016 ath the NEC Birmingham
Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2016 NEC Birmingham

Who Do You Think You Are? Live in Birmingham 2016 is over for another year and many of us who went enjoyed the mixture of all the main  genealogy companies and family history societies in one place.  Reports say that over 13,000  visitors attended this year, making it a busy three days. WDYTYA?Live! is considered to be the UK’s largest family history event in the genealogical year and The Society of Genealogists hosted the traditional fair, held numerous workshops and also provide a number of experts were on hand to answer questions.

American genealogical newsletter writer, Dick Eastman has blogged here about his experience of this years show which is well worth a look:  https://blog.eogn.com/2016/04/11/a-report-and-pictures-from-who-do-you-think-you-are-live-in-birmingham-england/

And check out some of the pictures The Nosey Genealogist has posted, along with a number of interesting video interviews from the show on the blog: Help Me With My Family Tree.

 

The Nosey Genealogist interviews Discover Your Ancestors' editor Andrew Chapman
The Nosey Genealogist interviews Discover Your Ancestors’ editor Andrew Chapman

TheGenealogist releases 4 unique record sets

New Record Sets Only On TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist launched 4 unique record sets at the recent Who Do You Think you Are? Live

  • The latest release adds over one million new parish records.
  • New Colour Tithe Maps for Surrey in partnership with Surrey History Center
  • New Colour Tithe Maps for Westmorland in partnership with The National Archives

 

Parish Records

With over 2.5 million Essex Parish Records their latest release makes TheGenealogist the place to go for Essex Research.

image#6034

The launch of 900,000 new Essex Parish Records transcripts brings the total coverage for that county to over 2.5 million individuals. Spanning the period from 1512 to 2005

These records with our BMDs and Census allow family historians to research ancestors from this eastern part of England with ease.

Also released are over 158,000 Worcestershire Parish Records, bringing Worcestershire’s coverage to over 2 million individuals

Colour Tithe Maps

TheGenealogist.co.uk in conjunction with the Surrey History Centre, has launched the Surrey Colour Tithe Maps.

Westmorland Colour Tithe Maps are published in partnership with The National Archives and is just one of the many counties to be conserved and digitised by TheGenealogist. Many more will be published in the forthcoming months.

These releases bring the addition of wonderfully detailed colour tithe maps to complement the online collection of tithe schedules and greyscale maps that have already been so well received by family historians researching where their ancestors lived.

This rich store of land occupation and usage records were created in a massive survey of England and Wales from between 1836 and the early 1850s.

In these early years of the Victorian period, at a time when people were moving from the countryside to the towns, many of the urban areas that we see today as part of cities and towns can be found mapped out as tithable plots. This includes some parts of London and other big cities where cottages and gardens are plotted in the same way as fields and woods are in the countryside.

Farnham town ( 2 pieces ), Fri Jul 03, 2009, 2:35:43 PM, 8C, 10666x14212, (0+0), 133%, Default Settin, 1/80 s, R36.3, G77.7, B93.7
Farnham Tithe Map

These records are made available online by TheGenealogist in a partnership with The National Archives and several County Record Offices.

 Brief History of Tithes

Tithes were an amount of produce given to the church, originally a tenth, then finally it became a tax on the income from the land. This was paid to the Church of England and to some lay people who owned the rights that had previously been due to the dissolved monasteries. In 1866 the majority of England and Wales was still paying what the government recognised was a discredited tax. Before they could legislate, however, they first had to collect details of what people paid – and so all the owners and occupiers of land subject to tithes were recorded and thus this fantastic resource was created.

To check out these new records head over to www.thegenealogist.co.uk