Tag Archives: Colour Tithe Maps

 

Press Release from TheGenealogist

 TheGenealogist logo

TheGenealogist releases York Colour Tithe Maps and Yorkshire Directories.

York racecourse image from 1866
Military review at York racecourse 1866 from TheGenealogist’s Image Archive

 TheGenealogist is very pleased to announce the release of the City of York and Ainsty Colour Tithe Maps, plus another significant batch of Yorkshire directories released in time for the Yorkshire Family History Show at York Racecourse.

To coincide with the return of one of the largest family history events in England, at the Knavesmire Exhibition Centre at the York Racecourse on the 24th of June and which is sponsored by TheGenealogist, today sees the release of a set of new records for York.

TheGenealogist has just added the colour tithe maps that cover the City of York and Ainsty to its National Tithe Records collection to compliment the gray scale maps and apportionment books that are already live. In addition it has released another 23 residential and commercial directory books to its ever expanding collection of Trade, Residential and Telephone Directories to help those with Yorkshire ancestors find their addresses.

The fully searchable records released online will allow researchers to:

  • Find plots of land owned or occupied by ancestors in early Victorian York and Ainsty on colour maps
  • See where your forebears lived, farmed or perhaps occupied a small cottage or a massive estate.
  • Discover addresses of ancestors before, between and after the years covered by the census in the Trade, Residential and Telephone Directories. (1735-1937)
  • Uncover details of the neighbourhood and understand communication links to other towns where your stray ancestor may have moved to.

For anyone with Yorkshire ancestors this new release from TheGenealogist  adds colour to the story of where their family lived. To search these and the vast number of other records covering the country see more at https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk

 

 

 

Find out more about your Yorkshire ancestors

To coincide with the York Family History Show in June, TheGenealogist has added the colour tithe maps that encompass the City of York to its National Tithe Records collection and detailed directories covering both early and later records.

The Tithe maps already cover all of the available gray scale maps and accompanying apportionment books for England and Wales and now includes the colour maps for York City and Ainsty as well. With Tithe records you can find the plots of land that were owned or occupied by ancestors in the Victorian period and so this can help you see where your forebears lived, farmed or perhaps had a small cottage.

York tithe map on TheGenealogist.co.uk
Parish of St Cuthbert’s York tithe map

For example, if we wanted to find the plot where one William Gibb lived in the parish of St Cuthbert during 1845 we can do this by selecting Tithe & Landowner on TheGenealogist and then enter his name into the Master Search. In William’s case he was the occupier while his landlady was Ann Wilson and we can see from the description in the Apportionment book that he rented a house and gardens from her. The value is small and the Rector is only entitled to 6d tithe rent from the plot. This is in contrast to another example that we can find in the York tithes.

Tithe apportionment books on TheGenelaogist
William Gibb’s house and garden in St Cuthbert

In the light of The York Racecourse being the venue for the York Family History Show, if we look for the owners and occupiers of part of the land on which the Racecourse sits we can see that it is both owned and occupied by The Freemen of Micklegate Ward of the City of York.

Tithe records on TheGenealogist
The Freemen of Micklegate Ward of the City of York appear as landowners and occupiers in the tithe records for the Parish of Middlethorpe

We are able to see an image of the apportionment book and this reveals in the description that the land is ‘Part of Knavesmire a stinted pasture’.

A ‘stint’ or ‘gait’ being a pasture that is limited to a certain number of animals. A person who has the right to graze their sheep or cattle on the stinted pasture may allow a fixed number of their livestock to feed there. Each grazier holds a certain number of stints and a formula will be in force that calculates the different value of each type of livestock. So one stint could equal one ewe with her lamb, while four stints may equal one horse.

Apportionment book for Middlethorpe 1838 on TheGenealogist
Apportionment book for Middlethorpe 1838

TheGenealogist’s result shows us that this landholding was plot number 31 and this detail is extracted from the apportionment book. Clicking the icon for the accompanying map we can now see that the pasture is in the middle of the racecourse.

The York Race Course at Knavesmire on a tithe map from 1838 found on TheGenealogist.co.uk
The York Race Course at Knavesmire on a tithe map from 1838

Anyone visiting the racecourse, whether it is for the family history show or to watch the races, can’t help but notice the old Terry’s Chocolate Factory next door. This art deco style facility, which no longer manufactures chocolate, was built in 1926. The company has, however, a long and rich history connected to York and by searching within one of the twenty three Yorkshire Trade, Residential and Telephone directories that have also been released by TheGenealogist this month, we can find the listing for the company. If an ancestor had a business then the commerical listings in the directory can help us find where they may have worked. In the 1897 Kelly’s York Directory we can find Joseph Terry & Sons Limited, manufacturing confectioners and see that at that time they had factories at Clementhorpe and at St Helen’s Square in York. The later address being where the family business had started and Clementhorpe was the factory on the River Ouse that allowed them to better distribute their products and import the raw materials – this move allowed Terry’s to really take off as a confectioner. We can, likewise, find the competing company of H.J. Rowntree & Co. within the same directory. It shows us that Rowntree’s had their business premises at Haxley Road and Tanner’s Moat.

 

Directories can also be useful to find the addresses of residents, the railways that served the area and read about communications links to other towns. These may be of help to the family historian who has ‘lost’ an ancestor as they could suggest where a person may have travelled and can be a great compliment to a census record. In the case of a head of the household we may be able to find an address different from that recorded in the decennial census. This may help fill in the gaps of where a stray ancestor moved to between the census. It can also add to our understanding of the place where our ancestors lived.

Sir Joseph Terry had been the Lord Mayor of York and in the year of this directory, 1897, he is still listed as an alderman and a magistrate. Similarly, John Stephenson Rowntree had been a past Lord Mayor and he too was an alderman and magistrate in this year. The 1897 Kelly’s York Directory reveals that they both lived at Mount Villas on The Mount; from this we can work out that they were close neighbours in York. The racecourse is also listed in this publication as having an address of Knavesmire, The Mount and so in the same area of the city.

Historical Trade Residential and Telephone directories
The 1897 Kelly’s York Directory just released on TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist’s National Tithe Record Collection covers all counties of England and Wales and so can be used to find where your English and Welsh ancestors lived at the time that this great survey took place between 1837 and the mid 1850s. The Trade, Residential & Telephone directories also encompass the whole country and can be useful both as research tool and as a valuable insight into the lives of our ancestors. They are a useful resource for tracing ancestors, particularly if they had a distinctive trade and can be used as a census substitute for the years prior to 1841 or after 1911 and also to provide information on their whereabouts between census years.

To search for your ancestors using these and the enormous number of other records on TheGenealogist read more at https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk

TheGenealogist releases Hampshire Police Letter Books and Northumberland Colour Tithe maps

This piece of news just came from TheGenealogist.

TheGenealogist logo

The data subscription site has just launched a new collection of Police Letter Books for Hampshire. This is an intriguing mixture of promotions, retirements, movements, and other observations about Police officers in this county from 1891 to 1911. In amongst its pages you will be able to trace the career of your Hampshire police ancestors as they rise or fall.

From the Image Archive on TheGenealogist
These records reveal names and collar numbers of officers promoted, reduced in rank or dismissed from the force for committing various acts of misconduct. The misdemeanors often seem to involve alcohol, ranging from accepting a glass of beer to being drunk on duty. For those more competent officers who were commended for their actions in the pages of these documents, you can read the actions that had been seen as deserving of inclusion in the Letter Books.

In addition, TheGenealogist has released the Colour Tithe Maps for Northumberland. These maps join the previously released greyscale maps for the majority of the country that are already published on TheGenealogist.

  • Contains over 600 colour maps, linking to over 62,000 tithe records for this county
  • These maps are a fantastic resource that enable you to see where your ancestors owned or occupied land in Northumberland
  • The only online National collection of tithe records and maps

 

Tithe map of Bilton, Northumberland on TheGenealogist
Tithe map of Bilton, Northumberland on TheGenealogist
Tithe map of All Saints, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland on TheGenealogist
Tithe map of All Saints, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland on TheGenealogist

The searchable schedules, or apportionment books, contain detailed information on land use and these are linked to the maps on TheGenealogist. Clicking through from the transcript to a map will jump straight to the plot for an individual and can reveal buildings, fields, houses, rivers, lakes, woods and also cover villages, towns and cities.

 


A case study using one of the new record sets

The Ups and Down of a life on the beat

The latest release of Police Letter Books for Hampshire is an eclectic mix of details of promotions and removals of officers (postings from one place to another), as well as recording such things as additional pay and a number of disciplinary matters that were handed out to the policemen of the Hampshire County Constabulary.

If we search for one late Victorian police officer in the records, named John William Walsh, we can see that P.C. 82 J W Walsh had set out on his employment in the force around 1893. On the 12th June of that year, our 3rd class Police Constable appears first in the Letter Books when he was being sent from headquarters to serve at Kingsclere Police station. As this officer appears no less than nineteen times in the records between 1893 and 1911, we can see that he was a career policeman having probably set his sights on progressing through the ranks. By the end of that same year, on the 8th November 1893, he had been transferred to Totton and promoted to 2nd Class Constable.

12 June 1893 Police Letter BooksSo far so good for John Walsh. In 1898 he had made 1st Class Constable and then the job took him to Brockenhurst.

January 1900 sees a blip in his job prospects when he failed his Sergeant’s exam, which is duly recorded in the records – but he bounces back a few months later. By the 18th June 1900, when he gets his coveted promotion to Sergeant and is ‘removed’ to Petersfield the same day, we now see that he has been allocated collar number 14. He crops up in the Police Letter Books in a note of an entitlement to extra pay for 13 days in 1905 and then in 1906 saw him reach the pinnacle of his career as he is promoted to Inspector!

What could possibly go wrong?

These new records on TheGenealogist show that, conversely, 1906 was also the worst year for John Walsh’s path up the ranks of the Hampshire County Constabulary. Promoted to Inspector in January 1906; in October he was on the way back down!

Police Letters Books -18th October 1906 reduced in rank
18th October 1906 reduced in rank

The Police Letter book for the 18th October 1906 sadly reveals that our Inspector, of nine months, was to be reduced in ranks to that of a 1st Class Constable. This must have been devastating for him and his family as he was not just going down one rank, to Sergeant, but back to where he had been eight years before. His offence: being drunk while on duty in Holdenhurst Road, Bournemouth.

A lesser man may have considered his position in the police, but not John Walsh. From the records we find the newly numbered P.C.165 removed from Bournemouth to Farringdon on the same day that he had been busted down in rank. A year later, in 1907, and he has been promoted to Sergeant for the second time in his police career. He is posted to Basingstoke with this rank with yet another change in collar number to 35. It was on the 22nd November 1911 that we see he had climbed further still. It was not quite to the rank that he had lost in 1906, but J Walsh was now a Sergeant Major in the force and was removed to Winchester.

Using these new records on TheGenealogist has enabled us to follow the ups and downs of one particular police officer who, like many of his colleagues, came a cropper through partiality to a drink. If you have Policeman ancestors from Hampshire then search this collection to find interesting mentions of them as they are removed to new stations across the county, are commended for catching thieves, receive promotions, or are sometimes disciplined for their actions.

See more at:

https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2017/police-letter-books-466/

May edition of Discover Your Ancestors Periodical out now!

Discover Your Ancestors Periodical

Great news! The May issue of Discover Your Ancestors Periodical is available now.

This month Ruth Symes threads her way through the history of needlework occupations, Harry Cunningham investigates the changing roles of hairdressers and barbers,  while Jill Morris takes a bird’s eye view of early aviation, Nick Thorne uses colour tithe maps, now available online, to look into the past of a colourful family that includes an Earl that was once a long distance truck driver, and much more.

Visit their website to buy your copy today:
http://www.discoveryourancestors.co.uk/current-issue/

TheGenealogist releases 4 unique record sets

New Record Sets Only On TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist launched 4 unique record sets at the recent Who Do You Think you Are? Live

  • The latest release adds over one million new parish records.
  • New Colour Tithe Maps for Surrey in partnership with Surrey History Center
  • New Colour Tithe Maps for Westmorland in partnership with The National Archives

 

Parish Records

With over 2.5 million Essex Parish Records their latest release makes TheGenealogist the place to go for Essex Research.

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The launch of 900,000 new Essex Parish Records transcripts brings the total coverage for that county to over 2.5 million individuals. Spanning the period from 1512 to 2005

These records with our BMDs and Census allow family historians to research ancestors from this eastern part of England with ease.

Also released are over 158,000 Worcestershire Parish Records, bringing Worcestershire’s coverage to over 2 million individuals

Colour Tithe Maps

TheGenealogist.co.uk in conjunction with the Surrey History Centre, has launched the Surrey Colour Tithe Maps.

Westmorland Colour Tithe Maps are published in partnership with The National Archives and is just one of the many counties to be conserved and digitised by TheGenealogist. Many more will be published in the forthcoming months.

These releases bring the addition of wonderfully detailed colour tithe maps to complement the online collection of tithe schedules and greyscale maps that have already been so well received by family historians researching where their ancestors lived.

This rich store of land occupation and usage records were created in a massive survey of England and Wales from between 1836 and the early 1850s.

In these early years of the Victorian period, at a time when people were moving from the countryside to the towns, many of the urban areas that we see today as part of cities and towns can be found mapped out as tithable plots. This includes some parts of London and other big cities where cottages and gardens are plotted in the same way as fields and woods are in the countryside.

Farnham town ( 2 pieces ), Fri Jul 03, 2009, 2:35:43 PM, 8C, 10666x14212, (0+0), 133%, Default Settin, 1/80 s, R36.3, G77.7, B93.7
Farnham Tithe Map

These records are made available online by TheGenealogist in a partnership with The National Archives and several County Record Offices.

 Brief History of Tithes

Tithes were an amount of produce given to the church, originally a tenth, then finally it became a tax on the income from the land. This was paid to the Church of England and to some lay people who owned the rights that had previously been due to the dissolved monasteries. In 1866 the majority of England and Wales was still paying what the government recognised was a discredited tax. Before they could legislate, however, they first had to collect details of what people paid – and so all the owners and occupiers of land subject to tithes were recorded and thus this fantastic resource was created.

To check out these new records head over to www.thegenealogist.co.uk