Tag Archives: family history research

Discover Your Ancestors June Offer

The Discover Your Ancestors Online Periodical was launched in May 2013 and has been providing a terrific mix of family history stories, case studies, social history articles and research advice. This regular and affordable service is a must have for anyone starting out in family history research or for those with more experience but who have reached brick walls. The high quality monthly digital magazine is delivered to your own personalised online account every month as a beautifully designed 30+ page online magazine. This regular and affordable service is highly recommended for anyone who is beginning to research their family tree as well as for those researchers who have more experience but may have reached brick walls in tracing their ancestors.

 

JUNE OFFER

Sign up today for only £24.99 and receive the following:

  • 12 monthly issues of the Periodical
  • Access to 500,000,000 birth, marriage and death records
  • Free data: Titanic passenger list
  • Free ebook: 1870s trade directory for Worcestershire

Read more at Discover Your Ancestors

Discover Your Ancestors Periodical for September now released

 

As September rolled in and autumn replaces summer, family history research returns to many people’s mind. What better time, then to read about this fascinating subject of researching your family tree in an online periodical designed and written by a team of best in class journalists to support and guide you through your genealogical journey?

In this month’s edition of Discover Your Ancestors Periodical you can read the following articles:

‘A true and perfect inventory’: Melvyn Jones describes the domestic comforts of a late 17th century farming family
Picturing the past: Nick Thorne explores how a free online image archive adds atmosphere to family history research
A day at the museum: For the last 400 years, museums have helped people to experience the world’s treasures
WDYTYA? is back: The popular genealogy TV show returns looking at  various celebrity trees
Are benefactors in the frame: Unique research into the lives of people who donated paintings to Glasgow’s museums
The legacies of history: Jill Morris explores wills from the 14th to 19th centuries, available online
History in the details: Jayne Shrimpton on clogs
Regulars: News & Events / Books / Place in focus: Northumberland / Classifieds

http://www.discoveryourancestors.co.uk/subscribe

Discover Your Ancestors Periodical - September

 

Georgian Era Family History – Society of Genealogists offer a full-day course on 13 June

For those of us that have managed to get back to the Georgian era of British history the Society of Genealogist is offering a full day course on the 13th June 2015. This period is normally defined as spanning the reigns of, the first four Hanoverian kings of Great Britain who were all named ‘George’: George I, George II, George III and George IV (covering the dates from 1714-1830). If you book yourself on the course you will learn more about the sources for family history research within this era.

Checking out the SoG websites gives the following details of the Full Programme:

10:30 – Genealogical Sources of the Georgian Era (Else Churchill)
11:45 – tea break
12:00 – Georgian Era Nonconformist records for Family History  (Les Mitchison)
13:00  – Lunch Break
13:45 – Georgian Era Military Records for Family History (esp Royal Navy) – (Les Mitchison)
15:00 – Tea break
15:15 – The Life and Times of An Army Wife in the Peninsular War (Rebecca Probert)
16:30/17:00 –  Q&A/Finish

This full-day course is on Saturday, 13 June, cost £35.00/£28.00 for SoG members. Places should be pre-booked, either through the SoG website or by telephone: 020 7553 3290.

Society of Genealogists
Society of Genealogists

Family history shop added to online site.

If you read my last post, then you will know that with a month to go I was writing my list for Santa (or at least as a massive hint for loved ones to buy me something useful this year!). So it is very timely that this news has come in from the team at TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist Family History Shop is now open!

Christmas is coming; it’s that time for giving and receiving again.

Are you looking for some great gifts to make a family historian happy this festive period? Simply head over to the fantastic new shop pages recently added to TheGenealogist for a great selection of scanners, software, archival storage, spring binders and charts. Made available in association with S&N Genealogy Supplies, the UK’s largest genealogy publisher and retailer, your present selection is covered this Yuletide.

While you are there, why not browse for something for yourself? To make sure that you get what you want in your stocking this year, just drop your loved ones the hint by giving them TheGenealogist shop’s page link.

TheGenealogist shop
TheGenealogist shop 

http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/shop/

Christmas presents for the genealogist

Christmas is coming; it’s that time for giving and receiving again. So its probably a good idea to start thinking about what a family historian might want to put on this year’s letter to Santa. So here is mine to get people started!

That  shoe box of photos, certificates and A4 family-pedigrees could really do with being more organised. I would really love it if, this Christmas, under my tree I’d find some hard backed binders, to protect all that valuable research I’ve done and preserve it in a more presentable way for future generations of the family to read.

Gift vouchers to allow me to buy exactly what I want are always well received, especially if they are family history related!

I would also be so grateful if that kind person, who regularly gives me the box of shortbread’s that does nothing for my waist line after all the other food on offer at this time of year, would substitute the biscuits with a non edible present instead. Perhaps a useful set of charts to present my family tree in a more attractive way than the print out from my computer, or the scribbled hand drawn tree on that sheet of paper that I have at the moment?

At the top of my list (hint ,hint!) would be a portable scanner, to capture images of the certificates and photographs that I see on visits to my relatives or at the archives.

Flip Pal

Family Tree reaches 1,000,000 DNA tests

Family Tree DNA, the genetic genealogy company and established market leader in the field of DNA testing, has announced they have now processed more than 1,000,000 DNA tests, many for family history research purposes.

The family finder test finds relatives within 5 generations and gives a detailed geographic breakdown of where your ancestors originate from, by comparing a person’s DNA to the DNA of other users in the Family Tree DNA’s huge database.

Here in the UK, TheGenealogist.co.uk offers DNA testing through Family Tree DNA. The range of DNA tests available can be found by clicking here on TheGenealogist website.

DNA genealogy testing
Family Tree DNA tests pass one million mark

Live web chat with Mark Bayley of TheGenealogist

Today sees the continuation of the live web chat series on the Who Do You Think You Are? magazine website with the Head of Online Content from TheGenealogist, Mark Bayley, featuring today and answering any questions from family historians.

Mark will be offering help and advice from 1pm to 2pm today and more details can be found on the Who Do You Think You Are? website

Mark Bayley
Mark Bayley answering questions on the Who Do You Think You Are? magazine web chat

Over half a million new Parish Records now available online

A collection of over half a million unique Parish Records has been added to leading family history website, TheGenealogist.

These cover the counties of Essex, Kent, Leicestershire, Monmouthshire and Worcestershire. The new online records offer invaluable records of baptisms, marriages and burials dating from the 1500s to the late 1800s from Anglican parish registers. The records are a great tool for those people looking to track down early ancestors before civil registration.

The latest releases bring the total to over 2 million parish records already added in 2014 with more to come. Fully searchable and clearly transcribed on TheGenealogist, they provide hundreds of years of records helping you find those early ancestors to further extend your family tree.

Mark Bayley, Head of Online Content at TheGenealogist remarked:   ”With Parish and Nonconformist Records it is possible to go back so much further and you never know what new surprises or dramatic events you may uncover in the records. We are continually adding more records to our already extensive collection throughout 2014.”

Parish Church records on TheGenealogist
New parish records added to TheGenealogist

7 ways to demolish your family history brick walls

7 ways to demolish your family history brick walls

Family history research is a rewarding and addictive hobby. However, we all reach a point when get stuck or hit that genealogy ‘brick wall’. At this point, it’s helpful to consult text books, visit family history society talks and also spend some time looking at the popular family history forums frequented by fellow family historians only too happy to offer help and advice.

Using this external help, I managed to discover 7 new  techniques that helped me break down some difficult brick walls in my family history research. They may help you in your search.

1.      A missing marriage record

Looking in numerous sources I could not find the marriage records for ancestors in the 1700s  in my family tree. I was advised to take a look at the ‘Fleet Marriage’ record sets. Known as record set RG7 from The National Archives, they cover over 800,000 clandestine marriages conducted by unscrupulous clergy around the Fleet debtor’s prison near London. Covering the years 1667 to 1777,    it covers over half of the marriages in London at this time.

2.      County boundary changes throwing us off the scent..

Areas of England and Wales have undergone numerous county boundary changes over the years and it can throw us family historians off the scent. I was trying to trace an ancestor in the village of Cradley in Herefordshire. After struggling locating the whereabouts of my ancestor, it turns out in various census records, the village, moved between Staffordshire, Worcestershire and Herefordshire through boundary changes!

3.      Overseas BMD records

Looking beyond the Civil Registration records helped open a few doors for me too. The National Archives overseas records can offer a great deal of record sets that can maybe help us track down that missing ancestor. There were 3 record sets I found useful, firstly RG33- Overseas BMDs of British Subjects (covering the years 1627 to 1960), this also included Lundy Island in Devon! RG32 covers Prisoners of War and Civilian Deaths overseas and finally RG34 which details foreign marriages including during World War 1.

The General Register Office (GRO) also have a number of overseas records including Marine & Army BMDs, Air Births, Informal certificates of births at sea and Consular BMDs. These records are also well worth taking a look at. I found TheGenealogist.co.uk particularly useful for records in this area.

4.      A nonconformist ancestor..

If you’re struggling to find an ancestor in the parish records, it’s worth looking at other religious denomination records that may provide the details of an ancestor you’ve been looking for. I discovered an ancestor (fortunately!) in the Quaker records of the nonconformist registers from The National Archives (series RG6). The record not only recorded immediate family from the wedding but the whole congregation!

  5.      Finding missing relatives using street search

As many of our ancestors often lived close to each other, it is worth taking a look at street names to track down a missing ancestor, you just may discover ancestors you weren’t aware of living in the same street! I discovered new ancestors in a search using the Street Search on www.TheGenealogist.co.uk

6.       Family forename search

Using TheGenealogist website I was able to discover a selection of ancestors that had previously been eluding my best search efforts. They had moved away from their original family home and I was able to track them down using the Family forename search- inputting the first names of the family (they had a common surname of Smith), the website narrowed down my search and discovered them in the 1891 census in Grimsby!

 7.       Will Records

Will records are a great way of discovering more information about your ancestors that can really break down those brick walls. Many will records offer comprehensive details of our ancestors lives, what they achieved, how much they were worth, who they favoured in their immediate family and who would gain the most from the will. They can be fascinating documents and can explain a period in time in your family history you previously knew nothing about.

What techniques have you used to break down brick walls? Let us know in the comments box below. 

DNA techniques aim to help solve murder mystery

An interesting piece of news from the BBC reports on how scientists are investigating the murder of a man in Northampton in 1930. At the time, the man’s badly-burned body was examined and samples taken during a post-mortem examination at a pub near the crime scene in the village of Hardingstone. The perpetrator was soon caught but the body was never identified.

Decades later, a woman was investigating her family ancestry when her grandmother revealed her long-held belief that her uncle was the man burned to death in a car.The uncle, William Thomas Briggs, left his home in London for a doctor’s appointment in November 1930, but disappeared and was never seen again. “My family were convinced that William was the victim,” said Samantha Hall, whose grandmother had confided in her.

The family were put in touch with the University of Leicester and the team that successfully identified King Richard III whose bones were found under a Leicester car park in 2012.

“The scientists were able to obtain a full single male mtDNA profile from the slide to compare to the family,” a spokeswoman for the team said. The result is due to be revealed to Ms Hall shortly. There’s more details available from the BBC website.

DNA genealogy testing
DNA helps solve murder mystery from 1930