Tag Archives: The National Archives

The National Archives to store government social media records

The National Archives have announced they will begin to archive tweets and You Tube videos previously published by UK central government departments.

According to TNA, the UK government social media archive contains over 7,000 videos that date from 2006 to early 2014 and over 65,000 tweets from 2008 to September 2013. It covers some major events in our recent history, including: The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, the London 2012 Olympic Games, Budget announcements and the formation of the Coalition government following the general election in 2010.

The aim is to permanently preserve them as official public records, for future generations to no doubt read what life was like, as we family historians do now! There’s more information at The National Archives website.

 

Social media records
Social media records of central government to be stored by The National Archives

Appointment of Chief Executive and Keeper at The National Archives

The National Archives have announced a new management appointment  this week.  Catherine Lee, Director General of Law and Access to Justice in the Ministry of Justice, has today announced that Jeff James has been appointed to the position of Chief Executive and Keeper, The National Archives.

Prior to his current role at the Chartered Institute of Housing, he was Director of Operations and Services at The National Archives for nearly six years. In this time he was responsible for leading the development and delivery of public services; overseeing The National Archives’ estates and assets; managing customer relations and maintaining service excellence.

He will take up his new post on the 29 July. More information can be found at The National Archives website.

Webinar places available at forthcoming TNA event

The National Archives’ record specialists are presenting free webinars, focusing on different series of records and the research skills that you will need to make the most of them. It’s a great free way of understanding some of the varied records available to view at The National Archives.

The next webinar is on the 12th May at  4pm, entitled ‘Why did people fear the Victorian workhouse?’ This webinar will help you to explore records in The National Archives, showing what life was like inside the workhouse, and how it was viewed by those outside. It’s presented by Paul Carter, specialist in modern domestic records.

If you’d like to view the free webinar, there are places still available . Book now by emailing webinars@nationalarchives.gov.uk or there’s more information at The National Archives website.

 

 

New event at The National Archives

The National Archives have an interesting free talk scheduled for Thursday 13 February, entitled ‘Spies like us: the secret life of Ernest Oldham’.

Presented by Dr Nick Barratt, author and TV presenter, the talk is of interest to anyone keen to find out about the past work of the security services and the files stored on their work at The National Archives. The security service files are held in ‘series KV 2’ and include fascinating details on many ordinary people, such as Foreign Office clerk, Ernest Oldham, who entered the world of espionage in the 1920s and 1930s, often with tragic consequences.

There’s more details available on the free talk from The National Archives website.

Ernest Oldham
The story of Ernest Oldham and the world of espionage

 

 

 

Appeals against conscription records in WW1 go online

In this year that commemorates the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, The National Archives has released another set of records from The Great War.  The ‘Appeals against First World War conscription’ records have now gone online.

The records are the case files of over 8,000 men who were appealing against conscription into the army between 1916 to 1918. The men applied to local military tribunals for exemption and if they were unsuccessful could then appeal to the county appeal tribunal. This new set of records cover the Middlesex Appeal Tribunal only and are classed in file series MH47.  More can be found at The National Archives website.

Conscription appeals records
New records released by The National Archives- ‘Conscription appeals’

Free talk this week at The National Archives

This Thursday, the 23rd January, sees a free talk from The National Archives entitled ‘Your Country Needs You’ looking at the recruitment posters of World War One, including the famous Lord Kitchener ‘finger pointing poster’. The talk asks if this was the most successful recruitment poster or if there were other more effective recruitment messages and posters that worked to encourage thousands of Britons to join up.

This talk draws upon official records from The National Archives to provide alternative and surprising stories. The talk is being given by James Taylor, former curator of the National Maritime Museum who also writes and lectures on maritime and military art and design.

There’s more information available from The National Archives website.

Kitchener talk from The National Archives
Talk on World War One recruitment posters and their effectiveness at The National Archives

Join the online crowd outsourcing partnership

The National Archives have appealed for volunteers to help tag First World War unit diaries as part of their new ‘Operation War Diary’ outsourcing partnership with the Imperial War Museum. Volunteers are needed to record people, places and activities from the diaries as part of this major project.

There are 1.5 million pages of war diaries from the British Army on the Western Front during WW1 which had been stored away in the archives. Volunteer help is needed to now reveal the stories of the men who fought in the Great War. If you have any spare time to assist you can sign up to the project here.

The end result should be a great resource for researchers and family historians alike.

World War One war diaries
WW1 war diaries offer us a window into life in the Great War

World War 2 RAF Casualty records now available to view

According to the latest news from The National Archives website, a collection of Second World War RAF casualty records has now been released to view.

The records were produced by the Air Ministry’s casualty branch following the loss of an aircraft or personnel. They include accident reports and correspondence with next of kin.

Known as the AIR 81 series, the first tranche  contains 316 packs dating from the beginning of the war in September 1939 to May 1940. However, many of the files contain correspondence which runs into the 1950s and even the 1960s.

This first collection of records does include some notable RAF raids from the early years of World War 2, such as the raid on the Albert Canal Bridges in Belgium in May 1940 when five aircraft from RAF No 12 Squadron were lost and the first Victoria Crosses of the war were awarded.

There’s more details at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/903.htm

New RAF Records released
New RAF casualty records released from the start of World War Two.

New collections of papers received by The National Archives

The National Archives have just announced the receipt of a number of valuable collections received by the UK government in lieu of tax payments.

Amongst the new collections are family and miscellaneous correspondence and early papers of the naturalist, Charles Darwin. Also received are correspondence, autograph collections, drawings and papers of Margaret Getty, the children’s writer who died in 1873. The correspondence of the Acton family , Barons from the 13th to the 20th centuries has also been received.

The National Archives have asked if any library, record office or similar institution in the UK is interested in obtaining the papers they should contact the Head of the Private Archives Team, Archives Sector Development, The National Archives. They can be emailed at: asd@nationalarchives.gov.uk for further information. The closing date is 28 February 2014.

‘Discovery’ webinar date announced by The National Archives

This year, The National Archives announced ‘Discovery’ their new online catalogue, would become the only way to search online through The National Archives record collections. Many family historians were used to the previous ‘Documents Online’ system in place before Discovery so to help with any queries and to help people find their way around the new online catalogue, The National Archives have announced a webinar on the 20 January 2014.

The webinar takes place from 14.00 to 15.00 hours UK time and will look at how to conduct searches, using keywords, filters and other useful features to help make the most of the ‘Discovery’ catalogue. It’s hosted by Audrey Collins and if you’d like more information, please visit The National Archives website.