Tag Archives: TheGenealogist

Additional Military Records released by TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist has released some useful records this week for those who are researching their military ancestors. Here is the press release that gives you more information and a link to a fascinating article:

Military Records on TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist is pleased to announce it has added two new record sets that will be useful for researching the First World War and Victorian soldiers.

  • Part one of this release is The Worldwide Army Index for 1851, 1861 and 1871 which adds another name rich resource to the already vast Military record collections at TheGenealogist with over 600,000 records
  • Also released at the same time is another 3,368 pages from The Illustrated War News covering 6 September 1916 to 10 April 1918 and adding to those previously made available for this First World War paper from 1914 to 1916

The Worldwide Army Index for 1851, 1861 and 1871

If you have not found your ancestor in the various British census returns, and you know that they may have been serving at the time in the British Army, then this new release from TheGenealogist may help you to find these elusive subjects.

Many thousands of men of the British Army were serving overseas in far flung parts of the British Empire over the 1800s. This index of names is compiled from the musters contained in the WO 10-11-12 Series of War Office Paylists, held at the National Archives, Kew. The 1851, 1861 and 1871 Worldwide Army Index lists all officers* and other ranks serving in the first quarter of 1851 and second quarter of 1861 and 1871, together with their regimental HQ location. The index is, therefore, effectively a military surrogate for the relevant census.

Over 70,000 records have extra notes that can indicate whether a soldier was a recruit awaiting transfer to a regiment, detached from his regiment or attached to another, possibly discharged, on leave, had deserted or retired. Men identified as using aliases are also included. Many notes include a place of birth and former occupation.

Also included within the records are recruits, boy soldiers, bandsmen and civilians working in the armed forces as clerks, pension recruiters, teachers and suchlike. Colonial regiments which invariably had numbers of British subjects are also featured.

The Illustrated War News was a weekly magazine during the First World War, published by The Illustrated London News and Sketch Ltd. of London. The IWN publication contained illustrated reports related entirely to the war and comprised articles, photographs, diagrams and maps. From 1916 it was issued as a 40-page publication in portrait format, having been landscape prior to this. It claimed to have the largest number of artist-correspondents reporting on the progress of the war until it ceased publication in 1918.

To search these and many other records go to: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/search/advanced/military/muster-book-pay-list/

or read our article at: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2017/worldwide-army-index-1851-1861–1871-661/  

*While the 1851 and 1871 include officers, the 1861 index excludes officers as they were not mustered in all the Paylists.

Nuneaton & North Warwickshire FHS worked with TheGenealogist to put records online

TheGenealogist logo

Press Release from TheGenealogist.

TheGenealogist adds to its growing collection of Parish Records with the release of those for Nuneaton & North Warwickshire.

  • Released in partnership with the Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society there are over 454,000 new fully searchable records of individuals
  • Allowing the researcher to discover more than 300,000 people recorded within the baptisms from this area in the heart of England
  • Family historians can also discover the details of over 90,000 individuals from marriages and nearly 60,0000 people listed in the burials of Nuneaton & North Warwickshire

Nuneaton & North Warwickshire FHS worked with TheGenealogist to publish their records online for the first time, making 454,525 individuals from baptism, marriage and burial records fully searchable.

“The officers of Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Family History Society are delighted to be working with The Genealogist to bring their collection of baptism, marriage and burial transcriptions for north Warwickshire online…” John Parton (Chairman)

With some of the surviving records reaching back into the 1700s this is an excellent resource for family historians to use for discovering Nuneaton & North Warwickshire ancestors.

The records are also available on TheGenealogist’s Society website FHS-Online.co.uk where societies get 100% of the income.

This new initiative will provide for those researchers preferring online access, while allowing us to continue offering the data on CD.  NNWFHS members have opportunity to take out an enhanced subscription which includes access to the data.” John Parton (Chairman)

This is an ongoing project with the society working on transcribing many more records.

“We’re delighted to welcome NNWFHS to both TheGenealogist and FHS-Online. This release adds to the growing collection of parish records on both websites. These partnerships help societies boost their funds whilst bringing their records to a much wider audience, through online publication.” Mark Bayley (Head of Online Development)

If your society is interested in publishing records online, please contact Mark Bayley on 01722 717002 or see fhs-online.co.uk/about.php

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Examples from Nuneaton & North Warwickshire Parish records

In these records can be found the famous novelist, poet, journalist and translator George Eliot, under her real name of Mary Anne Evans. She was born in Nuneaton and baptised at Chilvers Coton All Saints church in 1819 – she used the pen name of George Eliot in order to be taken more seriously as a writer.

For the settings of the stories, Mary drew on her Warwickshire childhood. Chilvers Coton became Shepperton. Shepperton Church is described in great detail in The Sad Fortunes of the Reverend Amos Barton, and is recognisably that of Chilvers Coton.

Nuneaton Chilvers Coton

Also to be found in these records are members of her family that she used as inspiration for some of her characters. For example the record for her sister Christiana Evans, baptised in 1814, contains a relevant note by the society that reveals: Sister of George Eliot. Christiana, ‘Chrissie’ as she was known to her family, was the original of: “Celia” in ‘Middlemarch’ & “Lucy Deane” in ‘The Mill on the Floss’.

If we search for Mary Anne’s brother, Isaac Pearson Evans who was born in 1816, there is a note which tells us that he was the brother of George Eliot and that he was the basis of Tom Tulliver in “The Mill on the Floss”.

Another person to be found in these records is a Henry Harper, born 1830, whose mother Anne has the note: Anne Harper – daughter of Rev. Bernard Gilpin and Mrs Ebdell (“Mr Gilfil” and “Caterina”) and was the son of “Mr Farquhar – the secondary squire of the parish” in “Scenes of Clerical Life” by George Eliot.

Additionally there is Isabell Adolphine Gwyther born in 1834 and Edward James Wilson Gwyther born in 1837, who share a mention that reveals: The Rev J Gwyther was Curate of Coton. He and his wife were the originals of “Amos & Milly Barton” in ‘Scenes of Clerical Life’ by George Eliot, “Milly Barton” was the mother of six young children.

Using these records you would also be able to find the death in 1836 of Christiana Evans, the writer’s mother.

How to start your family tree video

If you want to know how to start your family tree then here is a really useful video in which FeeBee shows you how to get started building your tree and also shares a great way to keep organised at the same time.

Hope you enjoy it!

Links used in this episode:
http://TreeView.co.uk
http://TheGenealogist.co.uk/Roots1

 

   “Hi I’m FeeBee in in this video up explaining how to get started in the fascinating world a family history the first step is to write down everything you already know about  yourself and your immediate family when where were you born? Who were your parents?
   Include dates and places of birth where known, next about you extended family, who were your grandparents and where did they live? Again, if you have dates of birth this will help you later on. Once you have the basic information ask any living relatives what they know or remember. You may find some research has already been done on a tree or they may be a collection of memorabilia documents or photographs that someone is willing to share with you the next step is to put this information into a tree builder.
   I use TreeView because I can access it anywhere has lots of charting options and
best of all it’s free.
   Let’s begin entering the information to TreeView. Start with yourself and then add your parents. Continue up the tree this way until you have entered all the information you have gathered. You can then look what you’ve entered so far and see which individuals have information missing such as names, dates the birth marriage and death places, events have taken place and so on. To fill in this missing information you should start looking at birth marriage and death and census records.
   There are lots of web sites that can help you with your research.
I use TheGenealogist they have a free trial available at TheGenealogist.co.uk/Roots1
   First try searching the census they should give you ages which you can use to find
approximate dates of birth. Using this information you can then search on the birth certificate index and so your research begins. Although it can be exciting to uncover many different branches of the tree bear in mind it is often easier to concentrate your search one direct line at a time.
  To recap, firstly gather what information you can buy talking to your living relatives
and start to input this information into to a tree builder as this will help keep you organized.
   Look into birth marriage and death and census records as the next step in adding information to what you already have.
   Thanks for watching this episode of RootsForum
   I hope you enjoyed this video. If you like this video and would like to see more go to YouTube.com/RootsForum  and hit subscribe if you have any questions ideas for the videos

Nelson’s Words

The BBC 2 TV programme: Nelson in His Own Words is on our screens today, or can be seen on the iPlayer for 30 days.

Horatio Nelson was Britain’s greatest naval hero and this programme shows us how he  was also a prolific letter writer. The correspondence reveals that Nelson was a very different and more complex man than the hero that Britain created after his death. Using Nelson’s letters this drama documentary exposes Nelson’s skilful and manipulative use of PR to advance his career, and shows how he was careful in his praise of his rivals – in case they threatened his own prospects. And the letters reveal how his passionate love affair with Lady Emma Hamilton changed his life forever.  The programme stars the highly regarded RSC actor Jonathan Slinger as Nelson.

In a twist, TheGenealogist have a fascinating article on their website that reveals more of Nelsons words but this time as featured in his last will and testament that can be found using their resources. Of particular interest is the codicil that Nelson wrote just before the Battle of Trafalgar “in sight of the combined fleets of France and Spain” that asked the King and Government to provide for his mistress, Lady Emma Hamilton. With the great victory that Nelson delivered, but losing his life in the process, the authorities heaped money and titles on his family while ignoring his very last wishes in the codicil he had written on the day of his death!

2 - The Death of Nelson

Family history shop added to online site.

If you read my last post, then you will know that with a month to go I was writing my list for Santa (or at least as a massive hint for loved ones to buy me something useful this year!). So it is very timely that this news has come in from the team at TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist Family History Shop is now open!

Christmas is coming; it’s that time for giving and receiving again.

Are you looking for some great gifts to make a family historian happy this festive period? Simply head over to the fantastic new shop pages recently added to TheGenealogist for a great selection of scanners, software, archival storage, spring binders and charts. Made available in association with S&N Genealogy Supplies, the UK’s largest genealogy publisher and retailer, your present selection is covered this Yuletide.

While you are there, why not browse for something for yourself? To make sure that you get what you want in your stocking this year, just drop your loved ones the hint by giving them TheGenealogist shop’s page link.

TheGenealogist shop
TheGenealogist shop 

http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/shop/

Bristol & Avon Family History Open Day

This Saturday 27th September is the Bristol & Avon Family History Open Day. It’s on from 10am to 4pm at The University of the West of England in Bristol.  Entry is £2 per person and young people under 16 have free entry.

There’s a number of excellent talks happening throughout the day including the popular ‘Breaking down brick walls’ with Mark Bayley from TheGenealogist, Jacqueline Wadsworth ‘The Effects of World War 1 on home life’ and Clive Burton ‘Bristol at the outbreak of World War 1 and the formation of Bristol’s Own’.

If you have ancestors in the Somerset, Gloucestershire or Avon areas, or live nearby, why not visit the Bristol & Avon Family History Open Day? 

There’s more details at the Bristol Family History Society website.

New Email News from S&N Genealogy Supplies

If you’d like to keep updated on the latest family history developments and special offers, it’s worth taking a look at the latest email newsletter from S&N Genealogy Supplies. With details on the latest record releases from TheGenealogist.co.uk  including over 1.3 million records of wounded soldiers from the First World War and a new collection of Distinguished Conduct Medals  now online and the latest downloads from Surrey parishes available from S&N, there is something for every family historian.

There is also a special offer on binders and sleeves if you’re looking to get all your valuable documents in order and a competition to enter to win some great prizes in this free e-newsletter. It’s all available at S&N Genealogy Supplies Email News.

 

 

New First World War Prisoner of War Records launched online

Latest news from TheGenealogist is the launch of over 80,000 fully searchable records of British and Commonwealth prisoners, of all ranks, who were captured in the First World War. The new records provide access to records of all servicemen taken prisoner between 1914 to 1918.

From Senior Officers captured, to the NCOs and Privates in the Infantry, the records are all found in the exclusive ‘Prisoner of War’ collection on TheGenealogist.  You can search all ranks for the first time on any family history website, giving access to the many soldiers, sailors and airmen captured and held behind enemy lines.

The records are fully searchable and provide the main details including, forename, surname, rank, regiment and the date the information was received. Records are found quickly and easily using the specific ‘Prisoner of War’ interface on TheGenealogist. 

Mark Bayley, Head of Online Content at TheGenealogist comments: “The new Prisoner of War records we’ve published are a great new unique resource for all family historians. If our ancestors were either officers or in the lower ranks, there’s now more chance than ever to discover their details including when they were taken prisoner and when they were released. Sadly many men never returned and our records will hopefully show the brave men who endured the terrible hardships of the Prisoner of War camps will not be forgotten and can now easily be traced by their descendants.”

More details can be found here on TheGenealogist.

PoW Camp in Germany
New prisoner of war records now available on TheGenealogist

 

Live web chat with Mark Bayley of TheGenealogist

Today sees the continuation of the live web chat series on the Who Do You Think You Are? magazine website with the Head of Online Content from TheGenealogist, Mark Bayley, featuring today and answering any questions from family historians.

Mark will be offering help and advice from 1pm to 2pm today and more details can be found on the Who Do You Think You Are? website

Mark Bayley
Mark Bayley answering questions on the Who Do You Think You Are? magazine web chat

New video available from TheGenealogist

Continuing the series of help and instructional videos, Mark Bayley from TheGenealogist has released a short video looking at how to search by address or street on the Census records using the excellent Master Search tools on TheGenealogist.co.uk

Also the £50 cashback offer is still available, visit TheGenealogist to take advantage of the limited time offer of a reduced price subscription.