Newsletter from S&N

Just had a look at the S&N newsletter that has popped into my email box.

They start with a look at what will be coming online from them throughout 2015:

Parish Records, detailed County and Tithe Maps, millions of new Medals Records, more Grave Memorials from the Volunteer Headstone Project, records of Railway Workers from Pensions to Staff Movements, Jewish records, detailed Street Maps, Passenger Lists, Emigration Records and more War Memorials are all going online at TheGenealogist this year.

And then we hear that this month they’ve released more War Memorials, Parish Records and have now added the 1911 census for all Starter and Gold Subscribers! You can make the most of this with £30 cash back on an Annual Gold Subscription, making it just £48.95 for the first year!

There’s no better way, they suggest, to start the new year than with some special offers – you can claim £50 cashback on a Diamond Subscription to TheGenealogist, and save £££s in their New Year Sale over at S&N Genealogy Supplies. They also take a look at 2014 in review.

Finally, there is an interesting article this month about Ancestors that fell foul of the law. As they write, these are always fascinating subjects for family history research. Their article is a Victorian murder story of a notorious Madam who escaped the hangman’s noose.

S&N email news

Dick Eastman to give keynote speach at WDYTYA?LIVE

Who Do You Think You Are? Live has announced the name of the Keynote speaker for the event in April.

Its to be the Internationally renowned genealogist and blogger Dick Eastman.

With more than 30 years of expertise, Dick Eastman is the founder of Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter, which has reported on family history news for 19 years and is read by more than 75,000 genealogists around the world.

Eastman will be speaking on all three days of the event, which is set to take place between 16-18 April at the Birmingham NEC. In his talk, the US blogger will be looking to the future of family history, considering how technology is changing family trees and the genealogical community.

To mark the show’s move to the West Midlands, Who Do You Think You Are? Live will also feature special Birmingham-themed displays and lectures, including sessions from popular local historian Carl Chinn on the real Peaky Blinders and a workshop on tracing Black Country ancestors with genealogist Michael Pearson.

In addition there will be the usual wide range of experts in attendance, including military historians, photograph specialists and representatives from family history societies across the UK and further afield.

Tickets are currently on sale from just £16 in advance and can be purchased at: www.whodoyouthinkyouarelive.com.

Dick Eastman

Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE 2015

The world’s largest Family History show is being staged at Birmingham’s National Exhibition Centre this year from the 16th to the 18th April 2015, moving to the Midlands after many  years exhibiting in London.

Tickets are on sale at: http://www.whodoyouthinkyouarelive.com/

Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE
Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE

This premier event in many a family historian’s calendar brings together all the main genealogy providers, family history societies and experts for one-to-one guidance.

There will be many talks on different facets of researching your forebears both in the SoG workshop studios as well as those on various stands in the main hall.

TheGenealogist family history talks at Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE
TheGenealogist  and S&N Genealogy family history talks on their stand at Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE

If you are looking for a high quality  family history monthly digital magazine delivered to your own online account every month then take a look at the Discover Your Ancestors Periodical.

It’s a beautifully designed 30+ page online magazine that is packed full of stories, case studies, social history articles and research advice. It really is a great resource for anyone starting out in family history research, or for those with more experience but who have reached brick walls.

This month you can read the following informative articles:

Parliament and the people: Nell Darby looks back at the people’s relationship with Parliament, that is now 750 years old.
The hidden treasures of gravestones: Nick Thorne explains more about what he learned photographing and transcribing headstones.
Revolutionary biscuits: A slice of Dublin history revealed.
Seeking out the pros: Keith Gregson explores what can be learned about professional sporting ancestors in online records.
The rise and fall of the Darfield Flier: Michael Rochford reveals an interesting story of a Victorian cyclist.
Archive heaven: Melvyn Jones highlights the treasures in the archives of our great landed estates.
From Company to the Raj: Jill Morris explores British India History in the details.
Jayne Shrimpton: On muffs.

Visit their website to pick up your copy today: http://www.discoveryourancestors.co.uk/

Discover Your Ancestors Magazine January 2015

New WW1 Records Released

New avenues of research are opened up by the latest release of unique Great War records online.

During the First World War many servicemen were reported as ‘Missing’ or ‘Killed in Action’ and for the first time you can now search a comprehensive list of these online. Usefully this includes the changing status of soldiers as the facts became clearer over time, as many assumed dead were found alive and those reported missing had their status updated.

TheGenealogist logo

This new release from TheGenealogist contains over 800,000 records. Included are 575,000 Killed in Action records, over 226,000 unique Missing-in-Action records and 14,000 Status Updates.

Over 100,000 people previously reported as missing had further status updates:

  • 59,500 were later reported as killed

  • 47,400 were later reported as PoW

  • 2,000 were later reported as rejoined

  • 4,200 were later reported as “not missing”

  • 8,400 were later reported as wounded

Mark Bayley, Head of Online Content at TheGenealogist comments:

“The telegrams and published lists of Dead and Missing must have had a huge impact on the lives of our ancestors. These records give an insight into what must have been an emotional roller coaster. They also give new avenues of research into what some researchers may have assumed were dead ends.”

These records are now available to Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist.

Example 1 Thought to be dead

Some people initially reported to be dead may turn out to be alive; the change in status is usually reported in the War Lists. If it had been assumed that an ancestor was dead, from the initial report, it could reopen a closed off branch of a family tree for further research.

An example of this type of positive record status change is Flight Sub Lieutenant Trechmann who was first reported as “Died As A Prisoner” in the Daily Lists of 6th June 1917.

Flight Sub Lieutenant Trechmann who was first reported as “Died As A Prisoner” in the Daily Lists of 6th June 1917.

By the end of July 1917 his status changed to Previously Reported Died As A Prisoner, Now Reported Alive and Still a Prisoner.

Finally, in December 1918, his records show that he was Repatriated.

PoW camp in the image archives on TheGenealogist

Example 2 Thought to be wounded

A different illustration, on many levels, is that of the 5th Earl of Longford. Within the Daily Casualty List on TheGenealogist for the 6th September 1915, we can find Lord Longford who had previously been reported as “Wounded”.

5th Earl Of Longford

Lord Longford "Wounded" 6 Sep 1915 in records on TheGenealogistHis status was then changed to be “Now Reported Wounded and Missing” and this alteration appeared in the daily list of the 27th September 1915

Lord Longford Previously Reported Wounded in Military records on TheGenealogist

During the First World War, Brigadier-General Lord Longford was in command of a division sent from their base in Egypt to Suvla on the Gallipoli peninsula as reinforcements during the Battle of Sari Bair.

The initial attack by other Divisions on Scimitar Hill had failed. With his men waiting in reserve, the 5th Earl and his troops were then ordered to advance in the open across a dry salt lake. Under fire, most of the brigades had taken shelter, but Lord Longford led his men in a charge to capture the summit of Scimitar Hill. Unfortunately, during the advance, he was killed.

Earl Longford’s body was never recovered and so, in the confusion of war, he was first recorded as “Wounded”, and then “Wounded and Missing”. Eventually, in 1916, he would be assumed to be dead.

Posterity tells us that the peer’s last words were recorded as: “Don’t bother ducking, the men don’t like it and it doesn’t do any good”.

To read more about these records and to read a featured article on TheGenalogist here.

World War I attack on Scarborough, Whitby and Hartlepool

On this day in 1916 the German Navy’s battle cruisers bombarded the north east of England.

The Germans had hoped that the raid would draw out the Royal Navy’s capital ships in pursuit of the raiders and so forcing them into engaging in a sea battle. Their tactic was for a large number of ships of the German High Seas Fleet to join the fight by following on behind.

The British force, however, managed to avoid being drawn into an unbalanced fight with the bulk of the German fleet. Unfortunately for the towns attacked, signalling errors and deteriorating weather meant that the raiding ships managed to slip the Royal Navy’s attempt to intercept them. The tragedy was that nearly 140 people – predominantly civilians – were killed and 600 were injured.

Searching TheGenealogist website, I have found a contemporary report in one of the newspapers and magazines on this site which give a flavour of how enemy actions were reported in Britain. The Great War  periodical gives us the sense of British outrage, at the time, under the no holds bared title of Crimes Germany has committed.

The Great War Issue 87 on TheGenealogist
The Great War Issue 87 on TheGenealogist

“The Bombardment by German warships of the coast towns of Scarborough, Whitby, and the Hartlepools, on the morning of December 16th, 1914, was a murderous act of barbarism.”

and later…

“A  Berlin newspaper proclaimed this wholesale slaughter to be ‘a further proof of the gallantry of the German Navy”

If you are researching ancestors from the First World War then the articles in these publications on TheGenealogist can be very useful to fill in background and sometimes find an ancestor named in a report.

Sir Patrick Moore’s collection to go to the Science Museum

The late TV astronomer Sir Patrick Moore had built up an extensive personal archive  of objects and written material including some of the draft scripts and memorabilia from the BBC programme The Sky at Night.

It has been announced that Sir Patrick’s collection has now been acquired by the Science Museum to preserve them. They will be kept at the Science Museum Library and Archives at Wroughton in Wiltshire.

http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/potw1023a/
Sky at night

December Newsletter from S&N Genealogy

The latest newsletter from S&N Genealogy has landed in my inbox with some seasonal promotions for the family historian.

S&N are giving away a Christmas gift to their readers of a free 3 month subscription to the online magazine Discover Your Ancestors.

They also have some fantastic Christmas gift ideas and special offers, including free Family History binders and sleeves, free gifts, and savings of up to £370 from their online shop.

You can now get the UK version of RootsMagic7, with its range of new features, from them and they are also taking advance orders for Family Historian 6 that is due out this month.

If you are looking for a special offer for a family history website subscription then you are in luck. In this newsletter I spotted that there is £40 cashback at TheGenealogist.

To also read a fascinating article, about experiences of transcribing headstones, take a look at their newsletter here: http://www.genealogysupplies.com/email_news.htm

It’s not what you know, its who your ancestors were!

If your surname reveals that your family came over from Normandy, the last time that England was conquered, then even today you are more likely to be upper class than the average member of the population in Britain. Quite astonishingly, the social status of your ancestors has more influence on your life chances than on your height. Normans recorded as property owners in the Domesday book of 1086 are 16 times more likely to be at Oxford or Cambridge in 1170 and still 25% more likely that their ancestors are there today.

Gregory Clark of the University of California, Davis and Neil Cummins from the London School of Economics have published an article in the Journal of Human Nature that shows that social mobility from 1170 to 2012 has always been slow and even now is not much greater than in the pre-industrial period.

An example being the Bunduck family whose name regularly appeared in the registers of the Oxbridge universities consistently from the 12th century until the modern day. The Bunducks were also found on the rich property owners’ database, which is another suggestion that they were of a higher class as is their appearance on the 19th century probate registry.

‘Strong forces of familial culture, social connections, and genetics must connect the generations,’ said Mr Clark.

‘Even more remarkable is the lack of a sign of any decline in status persistence across major institutional changes, such as the Industrial Revolution of the eighteenth century, the spread of universal schooling in the late nineteenth century, or the rise of the social democratic state in the twentieth century,’ added Mr Cummins.

Source: The Son Also Rises: Surnames and the History of Social Mobility. Gregory Clark (with Neil Cummins, Yu Hao, and Daniel Diaz Vidal and others), 2014. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.

The Son Also Rises