Welcome to the Family History Social

The very latest news from the world of genealogy

The Nineteenth Century through the reigning monarch's eyes

Queen Victoria's Journals

For those of us researching our ancestors the finding of a diary written by an ancestor would indeed be a red-letter-day.

For those of us researching our ancestors the finding of a diary written by an ancestor would indeed be a red-letter-day.

Not many of us are lucky enough to have access to such a resource. But in its absence we can read contemporary newspapers and magazines to get an understanding for the social influences on their world and what was happening around them.

Also of interest, to those researching the Victorian period, will be the journals written by the reigning monarch as they provide seven decades of royal history. Queen Victoria's Journals have been made available online in a partnership between ProQuest, the Royal Archives and the Bodleian Libraries. The result are high-resolution, colour images of every surviving volume of Queen Victoria's journals from her first entry in 1832 to close to her death in 1901.

 

Tracing the Victorian period through the eye's of the Queen this resource reflects the changes taking place in the nineteenth century as seen by Victoria herself.

Read more: http://www.queenvictoriasjournals.org/home.do

Leave a comment

New TV series: 24 Hours in the Past

There is a new series on Tuesday night on BBC TV  and on the iPlayer that gives all of us a great insight into a bit of social history. These types of programmes can give us family historians a better understanding of our ancestor's times and so make more sense of their lives. 24 Hours in the Past is a living reality documentary in which six celebrities travel back in time to the 19th century, spending four full days experiencing the relentless graft of the working poor in Victorian Britain. Impressionist Alistair McGowan, former minister Ann Widdecombe, actress Zoe Lucker, world champion hurdler Colin Jackson, actor Tyger Drew-Honey and presenter Miquita Oliver are the volunteers, whose first 24 hours lands them in the dustyard, where they have to sift through mountains of dirt, rotting veg and old bones. Presented by Fi Glover, with historian Ruth Goodman.
Leave a comment
Found 2 Results.
Back to top